associate degree in occupational studies

musical theater performance

Program Features

Business Class

Second year business class offers students seminars with Broadway performers and directors, casting directors, talent agents, managers and Actors Equity Association reps.

Repertoire

Working professional faculty assist students in preparing an audition repertoire of songs and monologues uniquely suited to their individual strengths as a performer.

Performances

Every student is cast in a performance each semester. Musical revues, selected scenes, song cycles and a full production in final semester mean you are always rehearsing for performance in front of an audience.

Mock Auditions

Mock auditions with casting directors and industry professionals allow students to get essential feedback on their song, monologue and dance auditions.

Curriculum

In the first year, focus is on building each of the artistic skills required of a musical theater performer. You will experience a personalized teaching approach to entry levels of Meisner, Singing Technique, Private Voice, Ballet, Music Theory. With live audience performance projects each semester, every student is cast and always rehearsing.

In a seminar with the librarian, learn to locate and identify high quality research materials. Work with the on-line tutorials on the NYCDA and New York Public Libraries. The class covers copyright, evaluating print and online sources and advanced internet searching, as well as in-depth instructions on Boolean searching techniques and controlled vocabularies used to search NYCDA and NYPL catalogs.

This is a required, non-credit course

A deep dive into Sanford Meisner’s techniques for achieving authentic reactions and behaviors. The course covers listening skills, repetition exercises, relationship-focused scene work, emotional preparation, imaginary circumstances, and point of view.

4.0 Credits

With an emphasis on the anatomy of the voice, this course addresses vocal technique that supports vocal health and progress. Students will be assigned up to three songs during the course of the semester and learn to approach the song through analysis, research and rehearsal in the same context as would a monologue.  Students learn and explore musical theater styles.  In-class performances will encourage constructive criticism from peers.  A mid-term and final performance will be presented to faculty and staff.

2.0 Credits

The course is designed to discover the expressiveness of the voice as an instrument for performance.  Students experience a relaxed physicality with fullness of breath, and are introduced to vocal tools to enhance expressiveness, which include: articulation, pitch, volume, resonance, and tempo variations.  A variety of text is explored to increase the actor’s connection to imagery and words.  Performances allow the students an opportunity to immediately apply vocal techniques to the acting of text, while receiving guidance and feedback from the instructor.

3.0 Credits

Students meet with their assigned private voice teacher for an individual session each week consisting of a total of 10 lessons per semester.  Private voice lessons begin in the 3rd week of each semester and emphasize the development of the student’s voice through singing technique exercises and a further exploration of repertoire.  Examination of the anatomy of the voice as well as proper care of the voice is also taught.

.5 Credits

This course covers ballet terminology and basic technique. Barre, center and across the floor work are introduced.  All levels from beginner to advanced are given individual care, attention, corrections, and support from the faculty to ensure progress.  Students are placed in class sections based on level of experience.

1.0 Credit

In this course the student will develop skills in sight reading.  The course incorporates sight singing, ear training, and written theory. Music theory foundations includes basic pitch and musicality with pitch notation exercises including aural and rhythmic dictation.

1.0 Credit

This course travels from research to performance.  Students will research and learn the history of the art form and examine its origins and development from operetta to the 1960’s.  Students will be assigned and perform songs and/or scenes from the periods studied to better understand the style and context in which the songs were written. Students will present a final performance to faculty, staff and students.  This performance is open to the public.

2.0 Credits

Prior to the start of class, students will partake in a dance placement process designed to assign each student to the appropriate level of Tap; beginner, intermediate or advanced. Students learn steps represented in the various types of tap: Rhythm, Classical, Broadway, and Post-Modern, with an emphasis placed on Broadway.  Students will perform choreographed numbers representing different types of tap as well as study iconic tap performances throughout history.  

1.0 Credit

Through the exploration of exercises based on the work of such people as Stanislavski and Hagen, students begin to explore the facets of the craft that allow actors to immerse themselves and take ownership of the given circumstances of a script in a truthful way. Endowment, emotional memory, sense memory, objectives and actions, and creating a moment before are some of the lessons that are covered. Simple A/B scenes begin the course, leading to scenes from plays.

2.0 Credits

The class will move through a series of exercises across the floor, building in complexity. Students will learn combinations in Jazz styles. The history of Jazz from the ritual and celebratory dances of the 18th century to present is discussed. An emphasis is placed on the great Jazz choreographers including but not limited to Jack Cole, Jerome Robbins, Bob Fosse and Michael Bennett.

1.0 Credits

This course introduces students to performance conditioning, a practice that focuses on:  strengthening the body to be adaptable and responsive at dance and theater movement.  Movement techniques from calisthenics to viewpoints that ensure the body has muscle memory and responsiveness during performance; stretching and relaxation techniques are utilized. This workout and training focuses on the different muscles needed for various genres of dance, theater and movement.

1.0 Credits

In this course, we apply, through heightened awareness, the principles of emotional preparation to specific text work. Exploring text; preparation techniques; personal invention; focus on believable behavior in order to achieve spontaneity and honesty in sharing.  Maintaining the integrity of the text, interpret material and act the moments as they are written; memorize and interpret speeches as well as perform a fully interpreted score. Interpreting material; acting in the moment; interpreting speeches; performing a fully interpreted score.

4.0 Credits

Actors Lab III challenges the student to use his or her analytical skills to build characters in organic and truthful ways. This is a natural progression from previous Actors Lab work.  Students will take the work they have been doing in Actors Lab I and Meisner class and apply it to the given circumstances of a play. Students will read and present scenes from contemporary American playwrights.

Credits 2.0

With an emphasis on the anatomy of the voice, this course continues to address vocal technique that supports vocal health and progress. Students will be assigned up to three songs during the course of the semester and continue to approach the song through analysis, research and rehearsal in the same context as would a monologue.  Students learn and explore non-musical theater styles of singing (jazz, country, pop, etc.).  Songs assignments will utilize non-traditional casting in an effort to encourage students to look outside their comfort zone and explore more diverse roles.   In-class performances will encourage constructive criticism from peers. A mid-term and final performance will be presented to faculty and staff.

Prerequisite: THE163

2.0 Credits

The course is designed to continue building on the vocal skills gained during Voice and Speech I in the previous semester.  The course uses Shakespearean plays to introduce students to more heightened text for an experience of a more energized and expressive voice.  Students are introduced to advanced concepts of vocal performance, including cadence, breath for thought, and word emphasis.  The course also uses a variety of contemporary texts from film and television to delineate and explore the vocal requirements for a variety of genres.  Students are given the opportunity to create their own performance script based on a Shakespearean character and are introduced to a rehearsal process to increase vocal variety and freedom of expression.

2.0 Credits
Prerequisite: THE164

Students meet with their assigned private voice teacher for an individual session each week consisting of a total of 10 lessons per semester.  Private voice lessons begin in the 3rd week of each semester and emphasize the development of the student’s voice through singing technique exercises and a further exploration of repertoire.  Examination of the anatomy of the voice as well as proper care of the voice is also taught.

Prerequisite: THE165

.5 Credit

Students continue to study within the appropriate level of ballet; beginner, intermediate or advanced.  Course work in all levels continues to address vocabulary, technique, physical form, alignment, muscle movement as well as barre and floor exercises.  Intermediate to advanced levels emphasize more complex ballet combinations.  A strong emphasis is placed on the actor/dancer telling the story through dance.

Prerequisite: THE166

1.0 Credit

Students continue to learn steps represented in the various types of tap: Rhythm, Classical, Broadway, and Post-Modern, with an emphasis placed on Broadway.  Students will perform choreographed numbers representing different types of tap as well as study iconic tap performances throughout history.

1.0 Credit

A continuation of exercises across the floor and combinations in Jazz styles. The history of Jazz from the ritual and celebratory dances of the 18th century to present continues and emphasis is placed on the great Jazz choreographers including but not limited to Jack Cole, Jerome Robbins, Bob Fosse and Michael Bennett.

1.0 Credit
Prerequisite: THE187

This course will emphasize sight-singing, pitch, scales, notating intervals, rhythm, harmony and chords.  More advanced students will delve into transposition of keys and written theory.

Prerequisite: THE167

1.0 Credit

This course travels from research to performance.  Students will research and learn the history of the art form and examine its origins and development from 1960s to present.  Students will be assigned and perform songs and/or scenes from the periods studied to better understand the style and context in which the songs were written. Students will present a final performance to faculty, staff and students.  This performance is open to the public.

2.0 Credits

Performance Year prepares you for the professional world of musical theater, including: auditioning, monologues, cold reads and building a repertoire of songs. The final semester introduces the on-camera musical, the dance audition, and a focus on the business of the business. Master classes taught by visiting industry professionals, and a main stage production of a musical finalize the two year program.

This course explores the primary elements of text analysis, enabling the actor to dissect and deconstruct a play and focus on breaking scenes into beats, finding actions, and applying research to the work.  Text is studied, rehearsed and performed throughout the semester.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent, THE182

2.0 Credits

Learn the technical aspects and differences for the actor working on a single camera and a multi camera set. Everything from hitting marks to adjusting to different camera angles. Who to listen to and take direction from -To having an understanding of everybody’s job on the set that is important to the actor. Learn all the terminology of working in film and television. What is Professional Behavior on a set and what is the actor’s responsibility. The class is taught from the actor’s point of view.

2.0 Credits

This course focuses on heightened language and style. With an emphasis on Shakespeare, Moliere, Wilde and Coward, students will learn and rehearse scenes working with appropriate costumes, props and set pieces.

2.0 Credits
Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Musical Theater Platform Year or equivalent.

This course builds on the acting (technical and scene study), vocal and movement work from the first year.  Through the rehearsal process, we will explore how the script as well as the musical and physical texts come together to create a musical theatre performance.  Understanding the historical context (when it takes place, when it was written) and stylistic context of the piece will be a focus in the work.  We will learn from and establish the rehearsal process leading up to performance. The instructor will choose 3 musicals for the semester – 2 or more scenes from each musical will be assigned and rehearsed.  Each scene will be double or triple cast allowing students to learn from each other’s work on the same scene. And ensemble piece will be taught from each musical.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent.

3.0 Credits

Students continue to meet with their assigned private voice teacher for an individual session each week consisting of a total of 10 lessons per semester.  Private voice lessons begin in the 3rd week of each semester and emphasize the development of the student’s voice through singing technique exercises and a further exploration of repertoire.  Continued examination of the anatomy of the voice as well as proper care of the voice is also taught.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent, THE185

.5 Credits

The objective of this class is to provide the student with the ability to utilize a variety of dialects that are useful for an actor as well as to understand the process of researching all accents first-hand.  Dialects covered may include but are not limited to: Standard British (RP), Cockney and Estuary English, American Southern & Deep South, Irish, Jamaican & West Indies, and General New York.  Finally, students will work in small groups to research and learn another dialect or accent of their choosing perform it as part of their final.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent

2.0 Credits

A continuation of exercises across the floor and combinations in Jazz styles. The history of Jazz from the ritual and celebratory dances of the 18th century to present continues and emphasis is placed on contemporary Jazz choreographers.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent, THE187

1.0 Credit

Students continue to learn steps represented in the various types of tap: Rhythm, Classical, Broadway, and Post-Modern, with an emphasis placed on Broadway.  Students will perform choreographed numbers representing different types of tap as well as study iconic tap performances throughout history.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent

1.0 Credits

Over the course of 15 weeks, students take part in creating their own work in a unique musical presentation that highlights the individual strengths of each student.  Students will write their own monologues and scenes and pair them with songs from musical theater.   Students may, where needed, develop choreography and/or play a musical instrument for their individual scene. A final production will be presented to staff, faculty and students.  This performance is open to the public.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent

3.0 Credits

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent

2.0 Credits

Students will be introduced to the principals and techniques that make partner dancing work: the 4 directional movements, component movements, foot placements, foot positions, 3 parts of the foot, the off-set dance position, 5 points of connection, poise and posture, the magic triangle, visual partnering, etiquette (the dance before and after the dance), how to lead, how to follow, music ID, timing, and rhythm.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent

2.0 Credits

This course breaks out the audition process into Vocal, Monologues, and Dance.  Song and monologue repertoire are chosen, workshopped and presented. Students will audition a song and monologue to a mock audition panel. Students will partake in a mock dance audition with combinations taught and performed.  Each section will be presented to a panel of industry professions for feedback.

1.0 Credit

The course is designed to enlighten students to the Business of Musical Theater, how to interact with industry professionals, and what they need to begin their careers. Students partake in a series of seminars with industry professionals – casting directors, agents, managers, actor union representatives, photographers, etc. Students will develop a resume, gain an understanding of how actor’s unions work, meet with a photographers for their headshots and learn the proper way to correspond with agents and casting directors.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent

1.0 Credit

This course focuses on contemporary comedy playwrights. With an emphasis on Neil Simon, Terrance McNally, Wendy Wasserstein, and Christopher Durang, students will learn and rehearse scenes working with appropriate costumes, props and set pieces.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent, THE161, THE181, and THE201

3.0 Credits

This course builds on the work done in Scene Study I and continues to explore how the script as well as the musical and physical texts come together to create a musical theatre performance. Two or more scenes from one musical will be assigned.  An ensemble piece will be taught from the musical selected.  Each scene will be double or triple cast allowing students to learn from each other’s work on the same scene.  The first half of the semester each scene will be blocked and rehearsed for the stage.  The second half of the semester the same scenes will be blocked and rehearsed in a two camera set-up.  Students will experience looping (ADR) of the song within the scene.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent, THE202

2.0 Credits

The Curriculum is divided into two sections Voice Over in the first 6 weeks and Commercials in the later 6 weeks. The 6 week Voice-Over portion of Commercials is designed to give the student a professional overview of the work available in the voice-over field and the tools to pursue that work. The Commercial on-Camera portion will introduce the concepts of “acting in commercials” as opposed to “commercial acting”; real space communication; and communicating thoughts vs. speaking words.

1.0 Credit / Prerequisites: Successful completion of Platform Year or equivalent. Be in Good Academic Standing.

Students continue to meet with their assigned private voice teacher for an individual session each week consisting of a total of 10 lessons per semester.  Private voice lessons emphasize the development of the student’s voice through singing technique exercises and a further exploration of repertoire.  Continued examination of the anatomy of the voice as well as proper care of the voice is also taught.

.5 Credit

Students continue to learn steps represented in the various types of tap: Rhythm, Classical, Broadway, and Post-Modern, with an emphasis placed on Broadway.  Students will perform choreographed numbers representing different types of tap as well as study iconic tap performances throughout history.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent, THE208

1.0 Credit

Students are introduced to freestyle, improvised dance indicative of Contemporary, and Hip Hop. Beginning with a warm up each class, students learn b-boying, street jazz, popping, locking and house that concludes in a high energy routine.   

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent

1.0 Credits

This course is a continuation of the audition process for Vocal, Monologues, and Dance.  On-Camera auditions are introduced. Song and monologue repertoire and on-camera sides are assigned, workshopped and presented. Students will audition a song and monologue and attend a mock on-camera audition. Students will partake in a mock dance audition with combinations taught and performed.  Each section will be presented to a panel of industry professions for feedback.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent, THE209

1.0 Credit

A continuation of exercises across the floor and combinations in Jazz styles. The history of Jazz from the ritual and celebratory dances of the 18th century to present continues and emphasis is placed on contemporary Jazz choreographers.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent, THE207.

1 Credit

Guest teachers from the Musical Theater world will conduct workshops and masterclasses throughout the semester. Master Classes may include but are not limited to Stage Make-up, Stage Combat, Puppetry, Luigi Jazz Technique, Song Performance with a Broadway performer, Sketch Comedy, etc. Guests teachers will include Broadway and Off-Broadway performers, directors and choreographers.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent

1.0 Credit

Students audition for, rehearse, and perform a full-length musical at a New York City theater.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the First Year or equivalent.

0 Credits

What Our students say

The Musical Theater program is a prestigious and serious program that is individually focused with your personal growth in mind.

Grant - Spokane, Washington

Prepare to empty your metaphorical cup of knowledge and open your mind, body and soul to dig into the art of musical theater.

Miah - Venetia, Pennsylvania